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Discussion Starter #1
im thinking that i might go to uti in a couple of years or earlier
has anybody looked into this place or have gone to or graduated from it
i feel like i got screwed with the place i went for two years.
with half ass schoolin i need to get into a better school and get to those dealers or performance shops.
if somebody could help that would be nice
and if anyone knows of a better school than uti let me know that also
 

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From what Ive seen on UTI, they mostly do diesel, personal watercraft, motorcycles, and foreign automakers. Honestly, in my area, it would be a waste of my time, because the only foreign (if you can call it that) would be honda. I was looking into NASCAR technical instutute, but hell, for $30,000 for 29 weeks, I could buy another balt for that.... Or mod the hell out of mine.
 

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NADC out of Nashville is one of the top schools in that category. you can specialize in performance, paint and body, or diesel
 

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uti is a waste of money. same with lincolntech. those places dont care if you learn anything as long as they have your 30 grand.


look around for GM ASEP or FORD ASSET classes. they're cheaper, through a community college, and you learn a hell of a lot more AND AND AND you're actually guarenteed a job when you graduate. you go to class 8 weeks, work at a dealership 10 - 12 weeks, and rotate back and forth for 2 years. I'm doing it now, and graduating soon. its by far better than UTI or Lincoln tech
 

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I dunno where house springs is, Longview Community College in Lee's Summit MO does both the ford and gm classes along with a general class for retarded kids who want retarded teachers. the gm and ford teachers are by far more intelligent. i would check into classes there if you want to do something like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
its near saint louis
uti offers hotrod u and super street for the performance
we had a guy come into the class and talk to us about it and the graduating students end up getting a good job after their done
ill look into the gm asep classes
 

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uti is a waste of money. same with lincolntech. those places dont care if you learn anything as long as they have your 30 grand.
no school cares if you learn anythng as long as they get your money. they're not in business to make the world a better place, they're there to make money.

why not just go to school for something that pays good like th IT or medical field. i do cars in my spare time at my dad's shop and work as a network admin for a goverment agency. make d*mn good money and get to play with cars too.
 

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I had a friend go to UTI for like a week then stopped going. Like the guy above said I only like it as a hobby and my friend noticed that too. Other than that I don't know anything about that.
 

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I had a friend go to UTI for like a week then stopped going. Like the guy above said I only like it as a hobby and my friend noticed that too. Other than that I don't know anything about that.
thats a heck of a plan, go into a medical field, or govt agancy. because working on cars nowdays is just troubleshooting. too much computer stuff on them, so its easier to find out whats wrong. my camaro, on the other hand, has a 65 model smallblock, no compute to tell you whats wrong....
 

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I don't know about UTI. But I can tell you a thing or to about NADC(Nashville Auto Diesel College). I am currently attending. I've been here since september and I'm on my 4th class. I go straight through the summer and graduate in October. I'm paying about 26,000 but that includes full tuition, full NAPA tool set, All you can eat meal plan and housing. They teach you the basics of gasoline and diesel and then you choose what industry you want to learn more about for the last three months of school. On a side note most of the automotive school are ran by the same people. UTI, lincoln tech and NADC are all ran by the same people I know for sure. If you want some info just PM me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
will the credits i have continue over to them
 

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thats a heck of a plan, go into a medical field, or govt agancy. because working on cars nowdays is just troubleshooting. too much computer stuff on them, so its easier to find out whats wrong. my camaro, on the other hand, has a 65 model smallblock, no compute to tell you whats wrong....
but i love to troubleshoot
thats the thing

if i go to a good college then troubleshooting would be a lot easier
the thing is i have never performance tuned or fixed up a big or smallblock engine.
the balt will be the first performance upgrade car
 

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But being a computerized car, the cobalt is mainly good only for bolt-on application. A non-smog/non-computerized engine you can mess with a lot more, and change te parameters easily.
 

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thats a heck of a plan, go into a medical field, or govt agancy. because working on cars nowdays is just troubleshooting. too much computer stuff on them, so its easier to find out whats wrong. my camaro, on the other hand, has a 65 model smallblock, no compute to tell you whats wrong....


nah not necessarily. the computer may give you a trouble code, but that doesnt mean "hey replace this part and the code will go away." theres a lot more to it than that. theres also more areas you can work in that dont even involve a ecm.

you gotta figure, you have suspension, driveability, transmission, heavy line(big jobs involving removal of the engine), light line (smaller jobs involving partial disassembly of the engine, you can do trim work (inside of the car stuff, seats, headliners, sunroofs ect.) or you can just change oil all day.

the computers in these cars will tell you whats wrong, yes, but, they wont tell you why its failing. thats the part you have to figure out.

persoanlly i like that its easier to figure out whats wrong with cars. now instead of spending an hour figuring out which cylinder has a misfire, you can look at a tech 2, see a p0304, and realize you have a miss on cylinder 4 and start testing. MUCH EASIER. but i have to disagree with you on the troubleshooting comment. i think there was actually more with cars like your camaro, when it took longer to pinpoint a failure.


back to the school thing. if you're looking to make a career out of this, the asep program is the way to go. 4 of my former classmates went to lincoln tech and uti. the one who went to uti didnt learn crap, but luckily hes good at painting and airbrushing. the other 3 went to lincoln tech. one came home early because he was homesick. the other 2 stuck it out and graduated, but only one got a job. and he didnt get into a dealership, or even working on cars. he installs aftermarket accesories on trucks. paid like 30 grand to get paid 8 bucks an hour. the other paid 30 grand to possibly end up working at his old job at a resturant. with the asep program, you have to have a GM dealership sponsor you for the program. you go to school for 8 weeks, and work at the dealership, (actually making money!) for 10 weeks, and rotate like this for 2 years.
 

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But being a computerized car, the cobalt is mainly good only for bolt-on application. A non-smog/non-computerized engine you can mess with a lot more, and change te parameters easily.

you can do all the same stuff to a car thats computer controlled. you can actually do more and tune it to run exactly how you want it to run. and if i remember right, 95% of the reason chevy small blocks are so popular is because of the aftermarket bolt on support.

heres my theory. if old engines like that were so great, why'd we replace them with engines controlled by computers?
 

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you can do all the same stuff to a car thats computer controlled. you can actually do more and tune it to run exactly how you want it to run. and if i remember right, 95% of the reason chevy small blocks are so popular is because of the aftermarket bolt on support.

heres my theory. if old engines like that were so great, why'd we replace them with engines controlled by computers?
its evolution! just like when people evolve to work with the world, so does everything else. true, the small block remained the same from 55- about 92 and then out came the drawing books and made something different.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
nah not necessarily. the computer may give you a trouble code, but that doesnt mean "hey replace this part and the code will go away." theres a lot more to it than that. theres also more areas you can work in that dont even involve a ecm.

you gotta figure, you have suspension, driveability, transmission, heavy line(big jobs involving removal of the engine), light line (smaller jobs involving partial disassembly of the engine, you can do trim work (inside of the car stuff, seats, headliners, sunroofs ect.) or you can just change oil all day.

the computers in these cars will tell you whats wrong, yes, but, they wont tell you why its failing. thats the part you have to figure out.

persoanlly i like that its easier to figure out whats wrong with cars. now instead of spending an hour figuring out which cylinder has a misfire, you can look at a tech 2, see a p0304, and realize you have a miss on cylinder 4 and start testing. MUCH EASIER. but i have to disagree with you on the troubleshooting comment. i think there was actually more with cars like your camaro, when it took longer to pinpoint a failure.


back to the school thing. if you're looking to make a career out of this, the asep program is the way to go. 4 of my former classmates went to lincoln tech and uti. the one who went to uti didnt learn crap, but luckily hes good at painting and airbrushing. the other 3 went to lincoln tech. one came home early because he was homesick. the other 2 stuck it out and graduated, but only one got a job. and he didnt get into a dealership, or even working on cars. he installs aftermarket accesories on trucks. paid like 30 grand to get paid 8 bucks an hour. the other paid 30 grand to possibly end up working at his old job at a resturant. with the asep program, you have to have a GM dealership sponsor you for the program. you go to school for 8 weeks, and work at the dealership, (actually making money!) for 10 weeks, and rotate like this for 2 years.
what is the best way to get a dealer to sponsor me
i dont work for a dealer , but want to, and i dont even kn ow where to apply for a job at any dealer
 

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what is the best way to get a dealer to sponsor me
i dont work for a dealer , but want to, and i dont even kn ow where to apply for a job at any dealer
well you can either go to the dealership and talk to the service manager, or you can call up longview and talk to them about it. when i started, i went to a dealership and the service manager said yeah without a doubt youre in. well. he got fired. so i went back and the next service manager said yeah youre in. well then he fired me before i even started working there so i sat in class for a few weeks and my teahcers helped find me a job. you could also start working at the dealer as a porter and then the service manager you wanna do the asep program. theres a few ways you can do it
 

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Just want to add my info. Weber State in Ogden, UT was a great asep program for GM, Ford, DCX, Honda, and Toyota out here. They will get you sponsored with a dealership in the program you choose. Then if you want to work for one of the car makers themselves you are in luck. They come out here and recruit all the time. I work in rental cars for a DCX affiliated company. DCX gets their rentals from us. They send their HR people up to Weber State regularly. I know FoMoCo and GM do the same. And usually their out of state tuition is cheaper than some, if not most, in state school tuition rates. And best yet, they are a 4-year institution which means you get a degree that shows you have completed the requirements for a BS which makes you more employable beyond the dealership should you want to actually design the next car. I'm thinking about going after I finish my Business Management degree at the University of Utah.

Another option is the Arizona Automotive Institute. I don't know much about them, other than they are supposedly one of the best and are very selective about who they let in. My brother got in on a full ride, but turned them down.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
well you can either go to the dealership and talk to the service manager, or you can call up longview and talk to them about it. when i started, i went to a dealership and the service manager said yeah without a doubt youre in. well. he got fired. so i went back and the next service manager said yeah youre in. well then he fired me before i even started working there so i sat in class for a few weeks and my teahcers helped find me a job. you could also start working at the dealer as a porter and then the service manager you wanna do the asep program. theres a few ways you can do it
how did ur teacher help u get a job
 
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